UFO Researchers Die Under Mysterious Circumstances

Many UFO researchers working on their research in the 1970s and 1980s died under mysterious circumstances, and may have been killed. This is the conclusion reached by an amateur astronomer, a former US government adviser Timothy Hood. He made this statement at an international conference in Amsterdam dedicated to search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

This statement is true not so much for the chasers for unidentified flying objects, but the researchers trying to find extraterrestrial life, including professional astrophysics. Hood’s conclusion was prompted by a 30-year study of this topic.

Famous American astronomer Morris K. Jessup, whose books about intelligent life beyond Earth have become bestsellers, committed suicide. He ended his life by placing an exhaust pipe in his car, locking his door and turning on the ignition.

Professor James Edward McDonald, who for many years served as head of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Earth and studied unidentified aerospace objects, put a bullet in his head.

Edward Ruppelt, who led a project for the study of unidentified objects in the skies over the United States, died of a cardiovascular crisis at the age of 37.

On November 5, 2001, William Milton Cooper, a famous UFO researcher who has repeatedly accused the US government of hiding the truth about UFOs, was killed by police in his home. Cooper, who clearly suffered from delusion, lived in Yeager (Arizona). He bought weapons in bulk to create units to fight a secret government led by aliens.

Before the incident the police were told that Cooper threatened harmless residents. The police surrounded the ranch where he lived. He said that anyone who would dare to cross the threshold of his private property would be killed, but the police ignored him. As a result, one policeman was seriously wounded, and the other one had to shoot the researcher in self-defense.

There is also the famous “Sheldon list.” The famous American writer Sidney Sheldon, working on his novel “The End of the World”, drew attention to a series of mysterious deaths among British specialists developing space weapons.

In October of 1986, Professor Arshad Sharif killed himself by tying one end of a rope to a tree, making a loop at the other end, putting his head through it and driving the car away.

A few days later another London professor, Vimal Dazibay, jumped head first from the Bristol Bridge. Both of them worked on the development of electronic weapons for a British government program, similar to the American “Star Wars.”

According to Timothy Hood, these deaths were not accidental, but rather, were the work of special services that eliminated the experts because they knew too much.

No related posts.

This entry was posted in Marginal Science and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.